Brain structural abnormalities in Doberman pinschers with canine compulsive disorder

@article{Ogata2013BrainSA,
  title={Brain structural abnormalities in Doberman pinschers with canine compulsive disorder},
  author={Niwako Ogata and Timothy E. Gillis and Xiaoxu Liu and Suzanne M. Cunningham and Steven B. Lowen and Bonnie L. Adams and James Sutherland-Smith and Dionyssios Mintzopoulos and Amy C Janes and Nicholas H. Dodman and Marc J. Kaufman},
  journal={Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry},
  year={2013},
  volume={45},
  pages={1-6}
}
Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) is a debilitating condition, the etiology of which is poorly understood, in part because it often remains undiagnosed/untreated for a decade or more. Characterizing the etiology of compulsive disorders in animal models may facilitate earlier diagnosis and intervention. Doberman pinschers have a high prevalence of an analogous behavioral disorder termed canine compulsive disorder (CCD), which in many cases responds to treatments used for OCD. Thus, studies of… Expand
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