Brain regions associated with acquisition and retrieval of verbal episodic memory

@article{Shallice1994BrainRA,
  title={Brain regions associated with acquisition and retrieval of verbal episodic memory},
  author={Tim Shallice and Paul C. Fletcher and C. D. Frith and Paul M. Grasby and R. S. J. Frackowiak and Raymond J. Dolan},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1994},
  volume={368},
  pages={633-635}
}
IT is widely held that conscious recall of past experiences involves a specific system—episodic memory1. Patients with amnesia have gross impairments of episodic memory while other kinds of memory remain intact2,3, suggesting that a separable brain system underlies episodic memory. We have used positron emission tomography (PET) to identify components of this system in normal volunteers. A dual-task interference paradigm4 was used to isolate brain areas associated with acquisition, and a cueing… 
The neural basis of episodic memory: evidence from functional neuroimaging.
  • M. Rugg, L. Otten, R. Henson
  • Psychology, Biology
    Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological sciences
  • 2002
TLDR
It appears that there is no single cortical site or circuit responsible for episodic encoding, and results of retrieval studies indicate that successful recollection of episodic information is associated with activation of lateral parietal cortex, along with more variable patterns of activity in dorsolateral and anterior prefrontal cortex.
Episodic memory meets working memory in the frontal lobe: functional neuroimaging studies of encoding and retrieval.
TLDR
This review fails to provide support for the functional-asymmetry model, suggesting instead that episodic memory encoding and retrieval may actually involve similar regions of the lateral prefrontal cortex when all factors relating to the type of stimulus material, are appropriately controlled.
The Role of Prefrontal Cortex in Verbal Episodic Memory: rTMS Evidence
TLDR
The results indicate that the nature of the material to be remembered interacts with the encodingretrieval DLPFC asymmetry; moreover, the crucial role of DLP FC is evident only for novel stimuli.
Episodic memory: from mind to brain.
  • E. Tulving
  • Psychology, Biology
    Annual review of psychology
  • 2002
TLDR
This chapter provides a brief history of the concept of episodic memory, describes how it has changed (indeed greatly changed) since its inception, considers criticisms of it, and discusses supporting evidence provided by neuropsychological studies of patterns of memory impairment caused by brain damage, and functional neuroimaging studies of pattern of brain activity of normal subjects engaged in various memory tasks.
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 24 REFERENCES
Functional mapping of brain areas implicated in auditory--verbal memory function.
TLDR
Brain regions showing increases in rCBF in these comparisons included the thalamus, left anterior cingulate, right parahippocampal gyrus, cerebellum and the superior temporal gyrus.
Memory and the hippocampus: a synthesis from findings with rats, monkeys, and humans.
  • L. Squire
  • Biology, Psychology
    Psychological review
  • 1992
TLDR
The role of the hippocampus is considered, which is needed temporarily to bind together distributed sites in neocortex that together represent a whole memory.
Functional activation of the human frontal cortex during the performance of verbal working memory tasks.
TLDR
Evidence is provided regarding the role of the mid-dorsolateral frontal cortex in mnemonic processing that are in agreement with recent findings from work with non-human primates.
Human organic memory disorders
TLDR
Andrew Mayes argues that the memory deficits found in several neurological and psychiatric syndromes comprise co-occurring elementary memory disorders, and outlines the implications of his taxonomy for the understanding of normal memory.
Activation of the hippocampus in normal humans: a functional anatomical study of memory.
TLDR
The results provide evidence for selective activation of the human hippocampal region in association with memory function and lead to a suggestion about the neural basis of repetition priming: following presentation of a stimulus, less neural activity is required to process the same stimulus.
Topography of cognition: parallel distributed networks in primate association cortex.
TLDR
The structure and functions of the frontal lobes, particularly the prefrontal "silent" portion, have recently again become the subject of intense interest and the availability of solid new findings in experimental animals and human patients and the promise of further discoveries are undoubtedly the basis of this renewed interest.
Distribution of cortical neural networks involved in word comprehension and word retrieval.
TLDR
It is concluded that single word comprehension and retrieval activate very different distributed regions of cerebral cortex, with Wernicke's area the only region engaged by both processes and with participation during silent word generation of networks involved in vocalization.
Selective impairment of memory and visual perception in splenial tumours.
TLDR
It is argued that (1) the amnesia is due to damage to the fornix where that structure is closely applied to the splenium and that it is the result of a disconnection between the frontal and temporal lobes, although the possibility that damage to more than one structure cannot be excluded.
...
...