Brain ontogeny and life history in Pleistocene hominins

@article{Hublin2015BrainOA,
  title={Brain ontogeny and life history in Pleistocene hominins},
  author={Jean‐Jacques Hublin and Simon Neubauer and Philipp Gunz},
  journal={Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences},
  year={2015},
  volume={370}
}
  • J. Hublin, S. Neubauer, P. Gunz
  • Published 5 March 2015
  • Psychology, Biology
  • Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
A high level of encephalization is critical to the human adaptive niche and emerged among hominins over the course of the past 2 Myr. Evolving larger brains required important adaptive adjustments, in particular regarding energy allocation and life history. These adaptations included a relatively small brain at birth and a protracted growth of highly dependent offspring within a complex social environment. In turn, the extended period of growth and delayed maturation of the brain structures of… 

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