Brain mechanisms for offense, defense, and submission

@article{Adams1979BrainMF,
  title={Brain mechanisms for offense, defense, and submission},
  author={David B. Adams},
  journal={Behavioral and Brain Sciences},
  year={1979},
  volume={2},
  pages={201 - 213}
}
  • D. Adams
  • Published 1 June 1979
  • Psychology, Biology
  • Behavioral and Brain Sciences
Abstract A preliminary attempt is made to analyze the intraspecific aggressive behavior of mammals in terms of specific neural circuitry. The results of stimulation, lesion, and recording studies of aggressive behavior in cats and rats are reviewed and analyzed in terms of three hypothetical motivational systems: offense, defense, and submission. A critical distinction, derived from ethological theory, is made between motivating stimuli that simultaneously activate functional groupings of motor… 

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