Brain disorders? Not really: Why network structures block reductionism in psychopathology research

@article{Borsboom2018BrainDN,
  title={Brain disorders? Not really: Why network structures block reductionism in psychopathology research},
  author={Denny Borsboom and Ang{\'e}lique O. J. Cramer and Annemarie Kalis},
  journal={Behavioral and Brain Sciences},
  year={2018},
  volume={42}
}
Abstract In the past decades, reductionism has dominated both research directions and funding policies in clinical psychology and psychiatry. The intense search for the biological basis of mental disorders, however, has not resulted in conclusive reductionist explanations of psychopathology. Recently, network models have been proposed as an alternative framework for the analysis of mental disorders, in which mental disorders arise from the causal interplay between symptoms. In this target… Expand
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