Corpus ID: 23272707

Brain aging in dogs: parallels with human brain aging and Alzheimer's disease.

@article{Head2001BrainAI,
  title={Brain aging in dogs: parallels with human brain aging and Alzheimer's disease.},
  author={Elizabeth Head},
  journal={Veterinary therapeutics : research in applied veterinary medicine},
  year={2001},
  volume={2 3},
  pages={
          247-60
        }
}
  • E. Head
  • Published 2001
  • Medicine
  • Veterinary therapeutics : research in applied veterinary medicine
Differentiating normal from pathologic aging is a challenge to veterinarians treating geriatric patients and to clinicians diagnosing Alzheimer's disease. Part of the difficulty stems from the lack of a biological marker. Dogs and humans develop similar cognitive dysfunction with age, and a subset of individuals develop severe impairments. Similar neuropathology also develops in the brains of elderly humans, individuals with Alzheimer's disease, and dogs. Both species develop senile plaque… Expand
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