Brain activation during abacus-based mental calculation with fMRI: a comparison between abacus experts and normal subjects

@article{Lee2003BrainAD,
  title={Brain activation during abacus-based mental calculation with fMRI: a comparison between abacus experts and normal subjects},
  author={Jason J. S. Lee and C. L. Chen and Tung-Hsin Wu and J. Hsieh and Y. Wui and M. Cheng and Y. Huang},
  journal={First International IEEE EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, 2003. Conference Proceedings.},
  year={2003},
  pages={553-556}
}
  • Jason J. S. Lee, C. L. Chen, +4 authors Y. Huang
  • Published 2003
  • Computer Science
  • First International IEEE EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, 2003. Conference Proceedings.
The question of the neural bases of computation processing is a highly debated topic and from a functional point of view, solving computation-based problems is a complex cognitive skill requiring numbers to be held and manipulated on a short-term representational medium while the dedicated resolution algorithm is applied. This study used a 3T fMRI system with BOLD contrast sequences to explore the brain activation differences between the abacus-based experts and the normal subjects through… Expand

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