Brain Systems for the Mediation of Social Separation‐Distress and Social‐Reward Evolutionary Antecedents and Neuropeptide Intermediaries a

@article{Panksepp1997BrainSF,
  title={Brain Systems for the Mediation of Social Separation‐Distress and Social‐Reward Evolutionary Antecedents and Neuropeptide Intermediaries a},
  author={Jaak Panksepp and Eric E Nelson and Marni V K Bekkedal},
  journal={Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences},
  year={1997},
  volume={807}
}
During the first year of life, human infants display affiliative behaviors and form “attachment bonds” with their caregivers. These bonds are manifested through selective approach and interaction with certain individuals who provide a “secure base” for other life activities, and various signs of separation-distress along with an emerging fear of strangers when isolation from such sources of support is perceived. Social reunion rapidly dissipates this type of emotional distress. The only way to… Expand

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