Brain Change in Addiction as Learning, Not Disease.

@article{Lewis2018BrainCI,
  title={Brain Change in Addiction as Learning, Not Disease.},
  author={Marc D. Lewis},
  journal={The New England journal of medicine},
  year={2018},
  volume={379 16},
  pages={
          1551-1560
        }
}
  • Marc D. Lewis
  • Published 12 October 2018
  • Psychology, Biology
  • The New England journal of medicine
Addiction as Disease or a Consequence of Learning? The nature of addiction remains a matter of debate. One school of thought is that addictive behavior is learned and is not the result of a patholo... 

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