Brain Aging and Midlife Tofu Consumption

@article{White2000BrainAA,
  title={Brain Aging and Midlife Tofu Consumption},
  author={Lon R. White and Helen Petrovitch and George Webster Ross and Kamal H. Masaki and John Hardman and James Nelson and Daron G. Davis and William R. Markesbery},
  journal={Journal of the American College of Nutrition},
  year={2000},
  volume={19},
  pages={242 - 255}
}
OBJECTIVE To examine associations of midlife tofu consumption with brain function and structural changes in late life. [...] Key Method Information on consumption of selected foods was available from standardized interviews conducted 1965-1967 and 1971-1974. A 4-level composite intake index defined "low-low" consumption as fewer than two servings of tofu per week in 1965 and no tofu in the prior week in 1971.Expand
EXAMINING ASSOCIATIONS OF BRAIN AGING WITH MIDLIFE TOFU CONSUMPTION
TLDR
It is believed that it is premature to issue dietary recommendations about the risk of eating tofu and a thorough discussion of the possible effects of misclassification is needed in the interpretation of analyses based on mismeasured or missing data. Expand
Variability in Midlife Systolic Blood Pressure Is Related to Late-Life Brain White Matter Lesions: The Honolulu-Asia Aging Study
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Variation in systolic BP in midlife may be a contributing factor to the development of WMLs and ventricular atrophy in late life, according to Japanese-American men in Hawaii. Expand
Midlife Blood Pressure and the Risk of Hippocampal Atrophy: The Honolulu Asia Aging Study
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Treatment with antihypertensive treatment modifies the association of BP and HA, such that high levels of BP adversely affect the hippocampus in persons never treated withAntihypertensives. Expand
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The results did not support the hypothesis that genistein intake, at the levels consumed by the study sample, benefits cognitive performance, and it is possible that the bioavailability ofgenistein in food sources is insufficient to exert a neurophysiological effect. Expand
The Honolulu-Asia Aging Study
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Results raise the possibility that different lipoprotein components of cholesterol may be differentially associated with dementia, and demonstrate an inverse relation between ApoA-I and cardiovascular disease, and extend these findings to the risk of dementia. Expand
Soy, Tofu and Brain Function in the Elderly
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It is found that participants over 68 years of age who consumed tofu daily or more had worse memory function and a greater risk of dementia, and these findings reflect those of estrogen treatment, where negative effects are found on cognition in older women and protective effects on cognition may occur in middle-aged women. Expand
Lower intake of vegetables and legumes associated with cognitive decline among illiterate elderly Chinese: A 3-year cohort study
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Lower intakes of vegetables and legumes were associated with cognitive decline among illiterate elderly Chinese, suggesting that dietary factors may be important for prevention cognitive decline. Expand
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There is evidence that older individuals with type 2 diabetes have an elevated risk for vascular brain damage and neurodegenerative changes, which may be the anatomical basis for an increased risk of cognitive impairment or dementia in type 1 diabetes. Expand
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TLDR
Total soybean and soy isoflavone intake might decrease the risk of cognitive impairment in elderly Japanese women, and Multivariate-adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for cognitive impairment with a 1 s.d. increase were higher in women than men. Expand
Tofu intake is associated with poor cognitive performance among community-dwelling elderly in China.
TLDR
High intake of tofu was negatively related to cognitive performance among community-dwelling elderly in China and similar findings were reported in Indonesia and in Japanese Americans in the US. Expand
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