Brain Activations during Visual Search: Contributions of Search Efficiency versus Feature Binding

@article{Nobre2003BrainAD,
  title={Brain Activations during Visual Search: Contributions of Search Efficiency versus Feature Binding},
  author={A. C. Nobre and Jennifer T. Coull and Vincent Walsh and Chris D. Frith},
  journal={NeuroImage},
  year={2003},
  volume={18},
  pages={91-103}
}
We investigated the involvement of the parietal cortex in binding features during visual search using functional magnetic resonance imaging. We tested 10 subjects in four visual search tasks across which we independently manipulated (1) the requirement to integrate different types of features in a stimulus (feature or conjunction search) and (2) the degree of search efficiency (efficient or inefficient). We identified brain areas that were common to all conditions of visual search and areas… Expand
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