Brain Activation During Silent Word Generation Evaluated with Functional MRI

@article{Friedman1998BrainAD,
  title={Brain Activation During Silent Word Generation Evaluated with Functional MRI},
  author={Lee Friedman and John T. Kenny and Alexandria L. Wise and Dee H. Wu and Traci A. Stuve and David A. Miller and John A. Jesberger and Jonathan S. Lewin},
  journal={Brain and Language},
  year={1998},
  volume={64},
  pages={231-256}
}
This is a study of word generation during functional MRI (fMRI). Eleven normal healthy subjects were instructed to generate words covertly, (i.e., silently) that began with particular letters. Images were acquired on a conventional 1.5T scanner at three contiguous axial planes encompassing language-related areas of the temporal and frontal lobe. The data were analyzed at the level of a Talairach box, after individually fitting the proportional Talairach grid system to each slice. The main… 
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