Brain–gut communication via vagus nerve modulates conditioned flavor preference

@article{Uematsu2010BraingutCV,
  title={Brain–gut communication via vagus nerve modulates conditioned flavor preference},
  author={Akira Uematsu and Tomokazu Tsurugizawa and Hisayuki Uneyama and Kunio Torii},
  journal={European Journal of Neuroscience},
  year={2010},
  volume={31}
}
It is well known that the postingestive effect modulates subsequent food preference. We previously showed that monosodium L‐glutamate (MSG) can increase flavor preference by its postingestive effect. The neural pathway involved in mediating this effect, however, remains unknown. We show here the role of the vagus nerve in acquiring this learned flavor preference and in the brain’s response to intragastric glutamate infusion. Adult rats with an intragastric cannula underwent total abdominal… 

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