Bragg diffraction and the iron crust of cold neutron stars

@article{LlanesEstrada2012BraggDA,
  title={Bragg diffraction and the iron crust of cold neutron stars},
  author={F. Llanes-Estrada and Gaspar Moreno-Navarro},
  journal={Astrophysics and Space Science},
  year={2012},
  volume={337},
  pages={129-135}
}
If cooled-down neutron stars have a thin atomic crystalline–iron crust, they must diffract X-rays of appropriate wavelength. If the diffracted beam is to be visible from Earth (an extremely rare but possible situation), the illuminating source must be very intense and near the reflecting star. An example is a binary system composed of two neutron stars in close orbit, one of them inert, the other an X-ray pulsar. (Perhaps an “anomalous” X-ray pulsar or magnetar, not powered by gas absorption… Expand

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