Boys withdraw more in one-on-one interactions, whereas girls withdraw more in groups.

@article{Benenson2006BoysWM,
  title={Boys withdraw more in one-on-one interactions, whereas girls withdraw more in groups.},
  author={J. Benenson and Anna Heath},
  journal={Developmental psychology},
  year={2006},
  volume={42 2},
  pages={
          272-82
        }
}
  • J. Benenson, Anna Heath
  • Published 2006
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Developmental psychology
  • Past research predicts that males will be more likely to withdraw in one-on-one interactions versus groups, whereas females will be more likely to withdraw in groups than in one-on-one interactions. Ninety-eight 10-year-old children engaged in a word generation task either in same-sex dyads or in groups. Boys completed significantly more words in groups than in dyads, whereas girls' performance was similar in the 2 social structures. Confirming the hypothesis, analyses of the dynamics of dyads… CONTINUE READING

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