Boys will be Boys: The Effect of Social Evaluation Concerns on Gender‐Typing

@article{Banerjee2000BoysWB,
  title={Boys will be Boys: The Effect of Social Evaluation Concerns on Gender‐Typing},
  author={R. Banerjee and Vicki Lintern},
  journal={Social Development},
  year={2000},
  volume={9},
  pages={397-408}
}
  • R. Banerjee, Vicki Lintern
  • Published 2000
  • Psychology
  • Social Development
  • Previous research has demonstrated that young children hold strong gender stereotypes for activities and toy, preferences. Some researchers have argued that this rigid gender-typing displayed by young children is associated with peer reinforcement for stereotypical behaviour and punishment of counterstereotypical behaviour. The present study tests the hypothesis that the gender-typing displayed by young children is at least in part an active self-presentational effort to win positive evaluation… CONTINUE READING

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