Bovid mortality profiles in paleoecological context falsify hypotheses of endurance running–hunting and passive scavenging by early Pleistocene hominins

@article{Bunn2010BovidMP,
  title={Bovid mortality profiles in paleoecological context falsify hypotheses of endurance running–hunting and passive scavenging by early Pleistocene hominins},
  author={Henry T. Bunn and Travis Rayne Pickering},
  journal={Quaternary Research},
  year={2010},
  volume={74},
  pages={395 - 404}
}
  • H. Bunn, T. Pickering
  • Published 1 November 2010
  • Geography, Environmental Science
  • Quaternary Research
Prey mortality profiles indicate that Early Pleistocene Homo at Olduvai was an ambush predator
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