Bottom-Feeding Plesiosaurs

@article{McHenry2005BottomFeedingP,
  title={Bottom-Feeding Plesiosaurs},
  author={Colin McHenry and Alex G. Cook and Stephen Wroe},
  journal={Science},
  year={2005},
  volume={310},
  pages={75 - 75}
}
Elasmosaurid plesiosaurs were an important part of Cretaceous marine reptile communities and are generally considered to have been predators of small, agile, free-swimming fish and cephalopods. Two elasmosaurid specimens from Aptian and Albian deposits in Queensland, Australia, include fossilized gut contents dominated by benthic invertebrates: bivalves, gastropods, and crustaceans. Both specimens also contained large numbers of gastroliths (stomach stones). These finds point to a wider niche… 

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  • Maria ZammitC. DanielsB. Kear
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    Comparative biochemistry and physiology. Part A, Molecular & integrative physiology
  • 2008
...

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