Both of Us Disgusted in My Insula The Common Neural Basis of Seeing and Feeling Disgust

@article{Wicker2003BothOU,
  title={Both of Us Disgusted in My Insula The Common Neural Basis of Seeing and Feeling Disgust},
  author={B. Wicker and C. Keysers and J. Plailly and J. Royet and V. Gallese and G. Rizzolatti},
  journal={Neuron},
  year={2003},
  volume={40},
  pages={655-664}
}
What neural mechanism underlies the capacity to understand the emotions of others? Does this mechanism involve brain areas normally involved in experiencing the same emotion? We performed an fMRI study in which participants inhaled odorants producing a strong feeling of disgust. The same participants observed video clips showing the emotional facial expression of disgust. Observing such faces and feeling disgust activated the same sites in the anterior insula and to a lesser extent in the… Expand

Figures, Tables, and Topics from this paper

A Common Anterior Insula Representation of Disgust Observation, Experience and Imagination Shows Divergent Functional Connectivity Pathways
TLDR
Voxels in the anterior Insula and adjacent frontal operculum were found to be involved in all three modalities of disgust, suggesting that simulation in the context of social perception and mental imagery of disgust share a common neural substrates. Expand
Inferior frontal gyrus activity triggers anterior insula response to emotional facial expressions.
TLDR
Activity in the IFO is causally triggered by activity in the IFG, and that this effective connectivity is specific to theIFG, shed new light on the intricate relationship between motor and affective components of emotional empathy. Expand
Dissociation between Emotional Remapping of Fear and Disgust in Alexithymia
TLDR
It is suggested that the emotional profile of HA individuals on the eVRT task could be related to their abnormal tendency to be focalized on their internal bodily signals, and to experience emotions in a “physical” way. Expand
Disgust and the insula: fMRI responses to pictures of mutilation and contamination
TLDR
The results of this fMRI study support selective disgust processing at the insula, and suggest distinct neural responses to contamination and mutilation. Expand
Disgust sensitivity predicts the insula and pallidal response to pictures of disgusting foods
TLDR
This study demonstrates that individual variation in disgust sensitivity is significantly correlated with participants' ventroanterior insular response to viewing pictures of disgusting, but not appetizing or bland, foods. Expand
Pupillary contagion: central mechanisms engaged in sadness processing.
TLDR
It is shown that diminishing pupil size enhances ratings of emotional intensity and valence for sad, but not happy, angry or neutral facial expressions, and this effect was associated with modulation of neural activity within cortical and subcortical regions implicated in social cognition. Expand
Neural correlates of internally-generated disgust via autobiographical recall: a functional magnetic resonance imaging investigation
TLDR
Findings suggest that areas previously associated with the perception of disgust (e.g., insula, basal ganglia) are also involved interoceptive experience of disgust. Expand
Brain networks involved in viewing angry hands or faces.
TLDR
Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to identify brain regions engaged during the observation of hand actions performed either in a neutral or an angry way and to provide further insights into the processes involved in the perception of others underlying, perhaps, social constructs such as empathy. Expand
Expanding the mirror: vicarious activity for actions, emotions, and sensations
TLDR
It is shown that mirror neurons for actions not only exist in the premotor cortex or in monkeys and that vicarious activity can also be measured for the emotions and sensations of others. Expand
Preferential responses in amygdala and insula during presentation of facial contempt and disgust
TLDR
The imaging data indicated significant activity in the amygdala and in globus pallidus and putamen during processing of contemptuous faces and disgusted faces elicited greater activation in the right insula and caudate. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 135 REFERENCES
The insula is not specifically involved in disgust processing: an fMRI study
TLDR
Findings do not fit the idea of the insula as a specific disgust processor, which is involved in the processing of visual stimuli depicting non-mimic disgust elicitors compared to fear-inducing and neutral scenes. Expand
A specific neural substrate for perceiving facial expressions of disgust
TLDR
Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to examine the neural substrate for perceiving disgust expressions and found the neural response to facial expressions of disgust in others is thus closely related to appraisal of distasteful stimuli. Expand
Neural mechanisms of empathy in humans: A relay from neural systems for imitation to limbic areas
TLDR
There was greater activity during imitation, compared with observation of emotions, in premotor areas including the inferior frontal cortex, as well as in the superior temporal cortex, insula, and amygdala, which may be a critical relay from action representation to emotion. Expand
Neural structures associated with recognition of facial expressions of basic emotions
TLDR
The results support the hypotheses derived from neuropsychological findings, that recognition of disgust, fear and anger is based on separate neural systems, and that the output of these systems converges on frontal regions for further information processing. Expand
A Role for Somatosensory Cortices in the Visual Recognition of Emotion as Revealed by Three-Dimensional Lesion Mapping
TLDR
It is shown that recognizing emotions from visually presented facial expressions requires right somatosensory-related cortices, and these cortices constitute an additional critical component that functions together with structures such as the amygdala and right visual cortices in retrieving socially relevant information from faces. Expand
Dissociable neural systems for recognizing emotions
TLDR
The hypothesis that the recognition of emotions would draw upon anatomically separable brain regions, depending on whether the stimuli were static or explicitly conveyed information regarding actions, is tested in a rare subject with extensive bilateral brain lesions, patient B. Expand
Neural responses to facial and vocal expressions of fear and disgust
  • M. Phillips, A. Young, +7 authors J. Gray
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences
  • 1998
TLDR
The findings support the differential localization of the neural substrates of fear and disgust and suggest a possible general role for the perception of emotional expressions for the superior temporal gyrus. Expand
An attention modulated response to disgust in human ventral anterior insula
TLDR
The analysis of spatial and temporal characteristics of insular responses to disgust facial expression lead us to underline the crucial role of ventral anterior insula in the categorization of facial emotional expressions, particularly the disgust. Expand
Neural systems for recognizing emotion
  • R. Adolphs
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • Current Opinion in Neurobiology
  • 2002
TLDR
Two important mechanisms for recognition of emotions are the construction of a simulation of the observed emotion in the perceiver, and the modulation of sensory cortices via top-down influences. Expand
Neuropsychology of fear and loathing
TLDR
Evidence from humans consistent with this approach has recently been obtained by studies indicating that signals of fear and disgust are processed by distinct neural substrates, which has implications for theories of emotion. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...