Botany for Gentlemen: Erasmus Darwin and "The Loves of the Plants"

@article{Browne1989BotanyFG,
  title={Botany for Gentlemen: Erasmus Darwin and "The Loves of the Plants"},
  author={J. Browne},
  journal={Isis},
  year={1989},
  volume={80},
  pages={592 - 621}
}
  • J. Browne
  • Published 1989
  • Sociology, Computer Science
  • Isis
MARRIAGES OF PLANTS. Florejtence. PUBLIC MJ4RRMGES, Flowers vifble to every one. IN ONE BED. Hufband and wife have the fame bed. .411 the flowers hermaphrodite: /jlaens andpi/lils in thefamtflower, 1 WITHOUT AFFINITY. Hufbands not related to each other. Statens notjoined together in aajy part. WITH EqUALITrY. All the males of equal rank. Stamens have no determitnate proportion of length. 2. ONE MALES. SEVIGN MALES. 2. TWO MALES. 8. EIGHT MALES. 3. THREE MALES. 9. NINE M'ALES. 4 FOUR MALES. lo… Expand
27 Citations

Topics from this paper

Flowery Porn: Form and Desire in Erasmus Darwin's The Loves of the Plants
When Erasmus Darwin announces that “the general design” of The Loves of the Plants “is to inlist Imagination under the banner of Science” (ii), an echo of the Song of Solomon (itself a touchstone forExpand
Sometimes a Stamen is Only a Stamen: Sexuality, Women and Darwin's Loves of the Plants
  • Julia List
  • Art, Medicine
  • Nineteenth-century contexts
  • 2010
TLDR
These responses collectively suggest that Darwin’s contemporary readers were more open to reading and talking about sex than is usually thought, but were also interpreting the text in a more conservative way, reading its imagery as consistent with prevailing views about sexuality rather than promoting a radical alternative. Expand
"A brilliant burst of botanical imagination" : Proserpina and the nineteenth-century evolution of myth
With popular interest in Linnaean botany thriving at the turn of the century, the Proserpina myth and its central focus on flowers and the feminine support nineteenth-century approaches to nature asExpand
Coleridge, Darwin, Linnaeus: The Sexual Politics of Botany
The final six essays offer close readings of particular authors. William Stroup gives a wonderfully lucid and com pelling reading of Jane Austen's Emma in the context of new agriculturalExpand
Blurring Plant and Human Boundaries: Erasmus Darwin’s The Loves of the Plants
  • C. A. Vaughn Cross
  • Sociology
  • 2020
This essay explores the role of drugs in Erasmus Darwin’s first scientific poem, The Loves of the Plants (1789/1791–92), whose purpose was to advance individual and public health prior toExpand
Science on the Table: A Botanical Approach to Floral Decoration on Porcelain in the Second Half of the Eighteenth Century
SCIENCE ON THE TABLE: A BOTANICAL APPROACH TO FLORAL DECORATION ON PORCELAIN IN THE SECOND HALD OF THE 18 TH CENTURY Sara O’Keefe, M.A. George Mason University, 2014 Thesis Director: JenniferExpand
Domesticating the Child: Maternal Responses to Hereditary Discourse in The Tenant of Wildfell Hall
This article examines the early nineteenth century connections between human, animal and plant by placing Erasmus Darwin’s The Botanic Garden (1791) and The Temple of Nature (1803) in conversationExpand
The "sensational" power of movement in plants: A Darwinian system for studying the evolution of behavior.
TLDR
Darwin's research on botany and plant physiology was a landmark attempt to integrate plant movements into a biological perspective of behavior, but its intended contribution to the field of evolution and behavior has been largely overlooked. Expand
Corresponding interests: artisans and gentlemen in nineteenth-century natural history
Early nineteenth-century natural history books reveal that British naturalists depended heavily on correspondence as a means for gathering information and specimens. Edward Newman commented in hisExpand
Erasmus Darwin's enlightened views on placental function.
In his major work "Zoonomia", Erasmus Darwin (1731-1802) devoted one chapter to the placenta, in which the new knowledge of the recently discovered element oxygen was applied to the functioning ofExpand
...
1
2
3
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 15 REFERENCES
Darwin's Metaphor: Nature's Place in Victorian Culture
In this collection of closely interrelated essays, Robert Young emphasizes the scope of the nineteenth-century debate on 'man's place in nature' at the same time as he engages with the approaches ofExpand
Shteir, "Linnaeus's Daughters: Women and British Botany" in Women and the Structure of Society
  • Selected Research from the Fifth Berkshire Conference on the History of Women,
  • 1984
Shteir, "Linnaeus's Daughters: Women and British Botany" in Women and the Structure of Society: Selected Research from the Fifth Berkshire
  • Conference on the History of Women,
  • 1984
Linnaeus's Daughters: Women and British Botany
  • Women and the Structure of Society: Selected Research from the Fifth Berkshire Conference on the History of Women
  • 1980
Naturalizing the Family: Literature and the Bio-Medical Sciences in the Late Eighteenth Century
  • Nature, Culture and Gender
  • 1980
1805); and Repton, Variety.-A Collection of Essays (London, 1788); see also The Red Books of Humphry Repton: Facsimiles of the Red Books for Sherringham in Norfolk, Antony House in Cornwall
  • Observations on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening
  • 1976
A Collection of Essays (London, 1788); see also The Red Books of Humphry Repton: Facsimiles of the Red Books for Sherringham in Norfolk, Antony House in Cornwall
  • 1976
The Idea of Landscape and the Sense of Place (Cambridge
  • 1976
...
1
2
...