Botanical insecticides, deterrents, and repellents in modern agriculture and an increasingly regulated world.

@article{Isman2006BotanicalID,
  title={Botanical insecticides, deterrents, and repellents in modern agriculture and an increasingly regulated world.},
  author={Murray B. Isman},
  journal={Annual review of entomology},
  year={2006},
  volume={51},
  pages={
          45-66
        }
}
  • M. Isman
  • Published 2006
  • Biology
  • Annual review of entomology
Botanical insecticides have long been touted as attractive alternatives to synthetic chemical insecticides for pest management because botanicals reputedly pose little threat to the environment or to human health. The body of scientific literature documenting bioactivity of plant derivatives to arthropod pests continues to expand, yet only a handful of botanicals are currently used in agriculture in the industrialized world, and there are few prospects for commercial development of new… 

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...

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