Botanical dermatology

@article{McGovernMAJMCUSA1998BotanicalD,
  title={Botanical dermatology},
  author={Thomas W. McGovern MAJ, MC, USA and Theodore M. Barkley PhD},
  journal={International Journal of Dermatology},
  year={1998},
  volume={37}
}
Before plunging into how plants may adversely affect the skin, let us consider how botanists organize the study of plants. Systematic botany is divided into taxonomy and nomenclature. The science of taxonomy describes and organizes plants, whereas the rules of nomenclature based on the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature (ICBN) are used to name them. With new discoveries, the science of taxonomy changes, and this may affect a plant’s nomenclature. 
3 Citations
Plants causing dermatosis in humans
TLDR
Dermatosis which occur without a direct contact with the plant are observed in those cases where certain perfumes, cremes or other cosmetic products are used.
An Unusual Reaction Associated With Paint

References

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Miscellaneous dermatitis-inducing plants.
Human Poisoning From Native and Cultivated Plants
TLDR
The authors have produced a useful compendium for the rapidly developing "poison centers" and the description of familiar plants adequate and useful for confirmation was found.
Phytophotodermatitis from mokihana fruits (Pelea anisata H. Mann, fam. Rutaceae) in Hawaiian lei
Bullous dermatitis, which resolved leaving hyperpigmentation and which was clinically consistent with phytophotodermatitis, affected the skin of the neck of 2 individuals who wore Hawaiian leis (as
Sensitivity to wild vegetation
74 patients suspected of having allergic contact dermatitis to wild vegetation were patch tested with ether extracts of 13 plants of the family Compositae and 7 other weeds or trees. Anthemis cotula
Plants and the Skin
TLDR
I was a little disappointed with the coverage of occupational exposure, as there was little mention given to carpenters, boat builders, floral arrangers, and certain other common exposure patterns encountered in the average dermatology practice.
Phytophotodermatitis
lous reaction, often accompanied by subsequent desquamation and denudation, occurs at areas of contact with the phototoxic plant or its juices after sun exposure. Confusion may arise in young
CONTACT DERMATITIS DUE TO ALSTROEMERIA (PERUVIAN LILY)
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  • Medicine
    The Australasian journal of dermatology
  • 1990
Two cases of hand dermatitis due to contact with the plant Alstroemeria (Peruvian Lily) are recorded. This plant has been increasingly used for making floral decorations during the last decade. As it
Sesquiterpene lactone allergy.
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  • Chemistry
    American journal of contact dermatitis : official journal of the American Contact Dermatitis Society
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Sunlight and the plant: a toxic combination: severe phytophotodermatitis from Cneoridium dumosum.
TLDR
A severe case of phytophotodermatitis occurred in a patient who had spent several hours walking through an area densely populated with Cneoridium dumosum, a common native bush that grows in the chaparral vegetation zone of southern California and Baja California, Mexico.
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