Borrelia burgdorferi in the Nervous System: The New “Great Imitator”

@article{Pachner1988BorreliaBI,
  title={Borrelia burgdorferi in the Nervous System: The New “Great Imitator”},
  author={Andrew R. Pachner},
  journal={Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences},
  year={1988},
  volume={539}
}
  • A. Pachner
  • Published 1 August 1988
  • Medicine, Biology
  • Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
There are many obvious similarities between Lyme disease and syphilis. The major ones are their spirochetal etiology, the ability of the spirochetes to stay alive in human tissue for years, occurrence of clinical manifestations in stages, early disease in the skin and later disease in the brain, and susceptibility to antibiotic treatment. Thus, one can assume that many of the same lessons learned from the centuries of experience with syphilis will apply to Lyme disease. One of these lessons… 
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