Born too late to win?

@article{Edwards1994BornTL,
  title={Born too late to win?},
  author={Stephen H. Edwards},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1994},
  volume={370},
  pages={186-186}
}
  • S. Edwards
  • Published 21 July 1994
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Nature

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