Born to dance but beat deaf: A new form of congenital amusia

@article{PhillipsSilver2011BornTD,
  title={Born to dance but beat deaf: A new form of congenital amusia},
  author={Jessica Phillips-Silver and Petri Toiviainen and Nathalie Gosselin and Olivier Pich{\'e} and Sylvie Nozaradan and Caroline Palmer and Isabelle Peretz},
  journal={Neuropsychologia},
  year={2011},
  volume={49},
  pages={961-969}
}
Humans move to the beat of music. Despite the ubiquity and early emergence of this response, some individuals report being unable to feel the beat in music. We report a sample of people without special training, all of whom were proficient at perceiving and producing the musical beat with the exception of one case ("Mathieu"). Motion capture and psychophysical tests revealed that people synchronized full-body motion to music and detected when a model dancer was not in time with the music. In… Expand

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