Borderline personality disorder and bipolar affective disorder. Spectra or spectre? A review

@article{Bassett2012BorderlinePD,
  title={Borderline personality disorder and bipolar affective disorder. Spectra or spectre? A review},
  author={Darryl L Bassett},
  journal={Australian \& New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry},
  year={2012},
  volume={46},
  pages={327 - 339}
}
  • Darryl L Bassett
  • Published 2012
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
Objective: Bipolar affective disorder and borderline personality disorder have long been considered to have significant similarities and comorbidity. This review endeavours to clarify the similarities and differences between these disorders, with an effort to determine whether they reflect different forms of the same illness or separate illness clusters. Method: The published literature relating to bipolar affective disorders, borderline personality disorders, and related areas of knowledge was… Expand
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