Book Review: The Mathematics of the Heavens and the Earth: The Early History of Trigonometry

@article{Brummelen2010BookRT,
  title={Book Review: The Mathematics of the Heavens and the Earth: The Early History of Trigonometry},
  author={Glen van Brummelen},
  journal={Journal for the History of Astronomy},
  year={2010}
}
  • G. V. Brummelen
  • Published 2010
  • History, Physics
  • Journal for the History of Astronomy
Glen Van Brummelen: The Mathematics of the Heavens and the Earth is published by Princeton University Press and copyrighted, © 2009, by Princeton University Press. All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced in any form by any electronic or mechanical means (including photocopying, recording, or information storage and retrieval) without permission in writing from the publisher, except for reading and browsing via the World Wide Web. Users are not permitted to mount this file on… Expand
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References

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Aujac 1976] for a discussion of the interaction between astronomy and geography, and the latter's use of both spherics and " spheropoeia " (which included the use of instruments)
  • Aujac 1976] for a discussion of the interaction between astronomy and geography, and the latter's use of both spherics and " spheropoeia " (which included the use of instruments)
  • 1996
35 By now the signs of the ecliptic were positioned so that Aries began at the vernal equinox, as op­ posed to the Babylonian practice of figure 1.2
  • 35 By now the signs of the ecliptic were positioned so that Aries began at the vernal equinox, as op­ posed to the Babylonian practice of figure 1.2
  • 1991
The origin of this lemma is lost, but it has been speculated that it was part of a pre-Euclidean collection of lemmas for use in the study of spherics
  • 50 From the Sand Reckoner
  • 1883
48 Neugebauer makes this case in [Neugebauer 1975
  • 48 Neugebauer makes this case in [Neugebauer 1975
58 The first of these inequalities is true because HK is what is left over when the two radii are taken away from CO. The second inequality is true because
  • 58 The first of these inequalities is true because HK is what is left over when the two radii are taken away from CO. The second inequality is true because
John of Muris, for an example of II.13 being used more legitimately as the Law of Cosines to solve a triangle
  • John of Muris, for an example of II.13 being used more legitimately as the Law of Cosines to solve a triangle