Bone breakage in the Krapina hominid collection.

@article{Russell1987BoneBI,
  title={Bone breakage in the Krapina hominid collection.},
  author={M D Russell},
  journal={American journal of physical anthropology},
  year={1987},
  volume={72 3},
  pages={
          373-9
        }
}
  • M. D. Russell
  • Published 1 March 1987
  • Geology
  • American journal of physical anthropology
The fragmentary condition of the Krapina Neandertal remains has been offered as one line of evidence for the hypothesis that these hominids were the victims of cannibals seeking marrow and brains. Two other hypotheses regarding the causes of the framentation have been raised: a substantial portion of the breakage in the Krapina collection is attributable to excavation damage; and the rest of the breakage is attributable to sedimentary pressure and to natural rock falls that occurred during the… 

Mortuary practices at the Krapina Neandertal site.

  • M. D. Russell
  • Geography
    American journal of physical anthropology
  • 1987
Data are presented supporting the hypothesis that the striations on the Krapina Neandertal remains are consistent with postmortem processing of corpses with stone tools, probably in preparation for burial of cleaned bones.

Cannibalism in prehistoric Europe

At Fontbrégoua, cannibalism remains the simplest and most plausible explanation of the evidence; at Krapina and other sites the available evidence is insufficient to prove either secondary burial or cannibalism.

Secondary burial in the Magdalenian: The Brillenhöhle (Blaubeuren, Southwest Germany)

The finds' context and the high frequency of butchering and defleshing marks in combination with the evident selection of the skeletal elements allow an identification of the finds in the Brillenhohle as a secondary burial of human skeletal remains.

Cannibalistic rites within mortuary practices from the Paleolithic to middle ages in Europe

Cannibalism in the Paleolithic and prehistoric periods in Europe has been a controversial subject in discussions. Widely accepted or fully denied, it has attracted the attention of anthropologists

Preservation Bias in the Hominid Krapina Sample ?

The processes which led to the formation of the Krapina hominid sample have been extensively debated with important implications for the interpretation of Neandertal behavior. This paper enters the

Bioarchaeology International (Volume 1)

The retrieval and re-deposition of elements of the human skeleton, especially the skull (i.e., cranium and mandible), is a common feature of Neolithic Near Eastern funerary practices. A complicated

Early Hominids in the Balkans

The aim of this paper is to introduce the human factor, in the shape of our Palaeolithic past, into the study of Balkan biodiversity and to identify those parts of the story of Pleistocene hominids

Preservation Bias in the Hominid Krapina Sample? A Randomization Approach

Examination of the issue of preservation bias between different skeletal elements within the Krapina hominid sample suggests these findings are consistent with a model based solely on randomness, and the null hypothesis, consistent with expectations of intentional burial, can therefore not be rejected.

Krapina 1: a juvenile Neandertal from the early late Pleistocene of Croatia.

This analysis demonstrates that Krapina 1 possesses morphological features that are primitive retentions; others that represent derived Neandertal specializations; and still others that are typical for all European late Pleistocene humans.

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Mortuary practices at the Krapina Neandertal site.

  • M. D. Russell
  • Geography
    American journal of physical anthropology
  • 1987
Data are presented supporting the hypothesis that the striations on the Krapina Neandertal remains are consistent with postmortem processing of corpses with stone tools, probably in preparation for burial of cleaned bones.

Butchering and marrow fracturing as a taphonomic factor in archaeological deposits

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THE foreword by G. Grant MacCurdy to the work under notice recalls that, after the discovery of a fragment of Neanderthaloid skull in Galilee (1925), and the International Archæological Congress at

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