Bone Loss After Hysterectomy With Ovarian Conservation

@article{Watson1995BoneLA,
  title={Bone Loss After Hysterectomy With Ovarian Conservation},
  author={Neale Watson and John W. W. Studd and T. J. Garnett and Michael Xenophon Savvas and Pamela Milligan},
  journal={Obstetrics \& Gynecology},
  year={1995},
  volume={86},
  pages={72–77}
}
Objective To examine the long-term effects of hysterectomy with conservation of the ovaries on bone density of the lumbar spine and proximal femur. Methods A cross-sectional study of the bone density of 40 postmenopausal women who had undergone hysterectomy with ovarian conservation before menopause compared with a matched group of 40 women who had not had hysterectomy. The 40 women who had undergone hysterectomy were also compared with a control population, using multiple linear regression… Expand
Does hysterectomy with ovarian conservation affect bone metabolism and density?
TLDR
The results suggest that the uterus may have a role in regulating bone metabolism that has not been detected previously in women having hysterectomy with ovarian conservation, and this could indicate a new role for the ovary in bone metabolism. Expand
Hysterectomy with Ovarian Conservation: Effect on Bone Mineral Density
  • G. Larcos
  • Medicine
  • The Australian & New Zealand journal of obstetrics & gynaecology
  • 1998
TLDR
Prior hysterectomy with ovarian conservation has no adverse effect on lumbar spine or femoral neck BMD, and Multivariate linear regression revealed that factors other than hystèrectomy were associated with lumbars spine and femoral necks BMD. Expand
[Pre-menopausal simple hysterectomy and post-menopausal female bone mineral density].
TLDR
It is suggested that pre-menopausal hysterectomy with bilateral ovarian conservation does not appear to cause an additional reduction in bone mass when evaluated in the post-menopause phase. Expand
Fracture risk and bone density of peri- and early postmenopausal women with uterine leiomyomas.
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Peri- and early postmenopausal women with a history of leiomyomas seem to have better bone mineral density and less fractures compared with those without leiomers, and this may be mediated through higher estrogen levels leading to higher BMD and the growth of leIomyomas. Expand
Randomized controlled trial of the effect of hysterectomy or LNG-IUS use on bone mineral density: a five-year follow-up
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In the treatment of menorrhagia, levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS, Mirena®) is compared with hysterectomy in terms of bone mineral density (BMD) and the effect of these treatment modalities on BMD was not compared. Expand
Hysterectomies are associated with an increased risk of osteoporosis and bone fracture: A population-based cohort study
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It is found that hysterectomized women might be associated with increased risks of developing osteoporosis or bone fracture. Expand
Reproductive, Menstrual and Menopausal Factors: Which Are Associated with Bone Mineral Density in Early Postmenopausal Women?
TLDR
Findings confirm the importance of HRT use and duration of menses as predictors of BMD, whilst the results for hysterectomy status and early oral contraceptive use require further consideration. Expand
Effect of induced uterine retroversion on bone mass in rats.
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It is indicated that uterine retroversion induced a loss of bone mass in rats, and the mechanism of bone loss merits further investigations, which currently occupy the interest. Expand
The age of ovarian failure following premenopausal hysterectomy with ovarian conservation
TLDR
This is the largest number of cases collected prospectively looking at ovarian failure after hysterectomy, with only 2% of women having confirmed ovarian failure by Kaplan–Meier estimate one year after surgery and 14% at five years. Expand
Ovarian function after hysterectomy in an Irish hospital population.
TLDR
In the absence of prospective studies elucidating the effect of hysterectomy on ovarian function, endocrine profiles should be performed in hysteretomised women complaining of symptoms, and endocrine levels were postmenopausal in six study and two control patients. Expand
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