Boldt: the great pretender

@article{Wise2013BoldtTG,
  title={Boldt: the great pretender},
  author={Jacqui Wise},
  journal={BMJ : British Medical Journal},
  year={2013},
  volume={346}
}
  • J. Wise
  • Published 2013
  • Medicine
  • BMJ : British Medical Journal
The withdrawal of almost 90 fraudulent studies by a German anaesthetist is one of the biggest medical research scandals of recent time. [...] Key ResultThe story starts in December 2009 when the journal Anesthesia and Analgesia published a study comparing the effect of two bypass pump priming solutions, albumin and hydroxyethyl starch colloidal solution, on markers of postoperative inflammation and organ function.1 On 18 December, two weeks after publication, a reader sent an email to the journal’s editor in…Expand
Boldt has never worked in the Czech Republic
  • K. Cvachovec
  • Political Science, Medicine
  • BMJ : British Medical Journal
  • 2013
TLDR
A recent article stated that Joachim Boldt has left Germany and is rumoured to be working as an anaesthetist, possibly in the Czech Republic, but this rumour is untrue and totally untrue. Expand
We need a culture change
Joachim Boldt is one in a long line of doctors who have published large numbers of fraudulent research papers.1 It is a mistake to view this simply as an individual’s dishonesty rather than toExpand
Coauthors must take some responsibility
  • W. Huang
  • Medicine
  • BMJ : British Medical Journal
  • 2013
The article on the German anaesthetist Joachim Boldt, whose faked works greatly influenced the field of anaethesiology and critical care medicine, suggests that Boldt was motivated by a greedy desireExpand
Systematic review not influenced by Boldt’s work
  • N. Haase
  • Political Science, Medicine
  • BMJ : British Medical Journal
  • 2013
TLDR
The German professor Joachim Boldt had most of his published work retracted in 2011 because he fabricated study data and lied about the reliability of his study data. Expand
What Anaesthesia is doing to combat scientific misconduct and investigate data fabrication and falsification
TLDR
This issue of the journal contains an analysis of 32 randomised controlled trials published from 1993 to 2012 in nine anaesthetic journals that demonstrates clearly that there is a high probability that the data in these trials are not consistent with random sampling. Expand
Fraud and retraction in perioperative medicine publications: what we learned and what can be implemented to prevent future recurrence
TLDR
A narrative review reports on six cases of forged publication in perioperative that resulted in the paper’s retraction and the process that led to unveil the fraud. Expand
Should hydroxyethyl starch solutions be totally banned?
The choice of which intravenous solution to prescribe remains a matter ofconsiderable debate in intensive care units around the world. Trends have been movingaway from using hydroxyethyl starchExpand
Is it the end of the road for synthetic starches in critical illness?
TLDR
There is no place for hydroxyethyl starch solutions in treatment of patients with sepsis, according to the World Health Organization. Expand
Concerns over use of hydroxyethyl starch solutions
TLDR
The evidence is discussed and doctors are called on to avoid using starch formulations, which have shown that hydroxyethyl starch increases the risk of death, kidney injury, and bleeding. Expand
An analysis of retractions of papers authored by Scott Reuben, Joachim Boldt and Yoshitaka Fujii
TLDR
Analysis of how long it has taken for papers authored by Scott Reuben, Joachim Boldt and Yoshitaka Fujii to be retracted shows room for improvement in the way that unethical or fraudulent papers are handled by journals and publishers. Expand
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  • Medicine
  • BMJ : British Medical Journal
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High-volume priming of the CPB circuit with a modern balanced HES solution resulted in reduced inflammation, less endothelial damage, and fewer alterations in renal tubular integrity compared with an albumin-based priming. Expand
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