Body weight, body-weight concerns and eating styles in habitual heavy users and non-users of artificially sweetened beverages.

Abstract

This study investigated reported body weight, concerns about body weight and eating styles in habitual heavy users (consume>825 ml/day) and habitual non-users of artificially sweetened beverages (ASBs). Groups of habitual heavy users (N=51) and non-users (N=69) were compared on measures of weight using self-reported body mass index (BMI), and measures of weight concern and eating style using the Dutch Eating Behaviors Questionnaire (DEBQ), the Yale Eating Patterns Questionnaire (YEPQ), and the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI). Habitual heavy users reported higher body weights (BMI), greater concerns about weight and greater tendencies toward certain eating styles, when compared to non-users. Using logistic regression, 82% of respondents were correctly classified as heavy or non-users of ASBs using body mass index and body-weight concerns. Associations between a heavy use of ASBs and certain eating styles can be explained by association with high body weights and concerns about body weight.

Statistics

050100'04'06'08'10'12'14'16
Citations per Year

98 Citations

Semantic Scholar estimates that this publication has 98 citations based on the available data.

See our FAQ for additional information.

Cite this paper

@article{Appleton2001BodyWB, title={Body weight, body-weight concerns and eating styles in habitual heavy users and non-users of artificially sweetened beverages.}, author={Katherine M Appleton and Mark T Conner}, journal={Appetite}, year={2001}, volume={37 3}, pages={225-30} }