Body shape variation within the Southern Cavefish, Typhlichthys subterraneus (Percopsiformes: Amblyopsidae)

@article{Burress2017BodySV,
  title={Body shape variation within the Southern Cavefish, Typhlichthys subterraneus (Percopsiformes: Amblyopsidae)},
  author={Pamela B. H. Burress and Edward D. Burress and Jonathan W. Armbruster},
  journal={Zoomorphology},
  year={2017},
  volume={136},
  pages={365-377}
}
The Southern Cavefish, Typhlichthys subterraneus Girard 1859, is one of the most fascinating stygobionts of the Amblyopsidae because of its undescribed diversity. Previous molecular analysis suggests the presence of at least ten distinct lineages in the Southeastern United States. Morphological variation for this group has not been quantified previous to this study. We quantified differences in body shape within the Southern Cavefish utilizing landmark-based geometric morphometrics. We found… 

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