Body proportions as information for age and cuteness: Animals in illustrated children’s books

@article{Pittenger1990BodyPA,
  title={Body proportions as information for age and cuteness: Animals in illustrated children’s books},
  author={J. Pittenger},
  journal={Perception & Psychophysics},
  year={1990},
  volume={48},
  pages={124-130}
}
  • J. Pittenger
  • Published 1990
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Perception & Psychophysics
  • Growth systematically changes the body proportions of both humans and animals so that the ratio of head height to body height decreases with age. Prior studies have demonstrated that body proportions provide effective information for age perception. To test the proposal that illustrators incorporate this information into their drawings, measurements were made of the head and body heights of 100 pairs of animals appearing in children’s picture books. In 93 pairs, the animal intended to be… CONTINUE READING
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