Body mass regulation and the daily singing routines of European robins

@article{Thomas2002BodyMR,
  title={Body mass regulation and the daily singing routines of European robins},
  author={Robert J. Thomas and Innes C. Cuthill},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2002},
  volume={63},
  pages={285-295}
}
Stochastic dynamic programming (SDP) models of daily singing and foraging routines in birds relate an individual's fat reserves to the relative costs and benefits of singing and foraging at different times of day. Two central predictions of such models are that: (1) overnight loss of fat reserves is higher on colder nights, and (2) birds sing more at dawn when their fat reserves are high. We tested these predictions in free-living European robins, Erithacus rubecula, by examining the… 
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