Body mass index and ovulatory infertility.

@article{Grodstein1994BodyMI,
  title={Body mass index and ovulatory infertility.},
  author={F. Grodstein and M. Goldman and D. Cramer},
  journal={Epidemiology},
  year={1994},
  volume={5 2},
  pages={
          247-50
        }
}
Several studies have examined the association between body mass index and infertility. We compared body mass index in 597 women diagnosed with ovulatory infertility at seven infertility clinics in the United States and Canada with 1,695 primiparous controls who recently gave birth. The obese women (body mass index > or = 27) had a relative risk of ovulatory infertility of 3.1 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.2-4.4], compared with women of lower body weight (body mass index 20-24.9). We found a… Expand
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