Body mass, bone “strength indicator,” and cursorial potential of Tyrannosaurus rex

@article{Farlow1995BodyMB,
  title={Body mass, bone “strength indicator,” and cursorial potential of Tyrannosaurus rex},
  author={James O. Farlow and Matt B. Smith and John M. Robinson},
  journal={Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology},
  year={1995},
  volume={15},
  pages={713-725}
}
ABSTRACT We describe a new life restoration of Tyrannosaurus rex, based on a fairly complete skeleton (Museum of the Rockies [MOR] 555). From the volume of this model, we estimate the live mass of the full-sized dinosaur as approximately 6,000 kg. Because MOR 555 is a representative of the gracile morph of T. rex, the mass of the robust morph may have been substantially greater. The “indicator of athletic ability” or “strength indicator” of MOR 555 is 7.5–9.0 meter2/giganewton, similar to… Expand
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