Body heat storage during physical activity is lower with hot fluid ingestion under conditions that permit full evaporation

@article{Bain2012BodyHS,
  title={Body heat storage during physical activity is lower with hot fluid ingestion under conditions that permit full evaporation},
  author={A. Bain and N. C. Lesperance and O. Jay},
  journal={Acta Physiologica},
  year={2012},
  volume={206}
}
To assess whether, under conditions permitting full evaporation, body heat storage during physical activity measured by partitional calorimetry would be lower with warm relative to cold fluid ingestion because of a disproportionate increase in evaporative heat loss potential relative to internal heat transfer with the ingested fluid. 
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