Body-form Evolution in the Scincid Lizard Clade Lerista and the Mode of Macroevolutionary Transitions

@article{Skinner2009BodyformEI,
  title={Body-form Evolution in the Scincid Lizard Clade Lerista and the Mode of Macroevolutionary Transitions},
  author={Adam Skinner and Michael S. Y. Lee},
  journal={Evolutionary Biology},
  year={2009},
  volume={36},
  pages={292-300}
}
The scincid lizard clade Lerista provides an exceptional model for studying the mode of substantial evolutionary transformations, comprising more than 90 species displaying a remarkable variety of body forms. Patterns of character evolution in this clade, inferred from reconstructed ancestral states, are at least partly consistent with the correlated progression model of macroevolutionary change. At each stage in the transition to a highly elongate, limb-reduced body plan, alterations to the… Expand

Figures and Tables from this paper

Evolutionary history of elongation and maximum body length in moray eels (Anguilliformes: Muraenidae)
TLDR
It is found that body elongation in morays evolves independently of elongation of the vertebral column, and it is shown that body shape and body length may evolve independently of each other and (in the case of shape) of the spinal column. Expand
Evolution of Body Elongation in Gymnophthalmid Lizards: Relationships with Climate
TLDR
The present study establishes a connection between morphology and a broader natural component, climate, and introduces new questions about the spatial distribution of morphological variation among squamates. Expand
The convergent evolution of snake‐like forms by divergent evolutionary pathways in squamate reptiles *
TLDR
An important role of historical contingency as opposed to determinism is suggested in the convergent evolution of snake‐like body shapes in six clades of lizards, which showed that clades followed different evolutionary pathways. Expand
Convergent body shapes have evolved via deterministic and historically contingent pathways in Lerista lizards
TLDR
This work tested for morphological convergence in body elongation and limb reduction and the evolutionary pathways that gave rise to them in two major clades of Lerista, a species-rich genus of semi-fossorial lizards endemic to Australia, and showed strong evidence that the two clades evolved deterministically. Expand
Overcoming phylogenetic and geographic uncertainties to test for correlates of range size evolution in gymnophthalmid lizards
TLDR
The application of morphology–range size relationships to conservation planning is discussed in the light of existing uncertainties in the geographic knowledge of the studied species group and workarounds for data availability are discussed. Expand
Locomotion and palaeoclimate explain the re-evolution of quadrupedal body form in Brachymeles lizards
TLDR
It is shown that large, quadrupedal species are faster at burying and surface locomotion than snake-like species, indicating a lack of expected performance trade-off between these modes of locomotion. Expand
The relationship between limb reduction, body elongation and geographical range in lizards (Lerista, Scincidae)
TLDR
A general predictive relationship between body form and geographical range size in lizards is suggested: elongate, limb-reduced lizards tend to exhibit more restricted geographical ranges that may reflect reduced dispersal ability and may also predispose them to greater vulnerability of extinction. Expand
Evolution of fossorial locomotion in the transition from tetrapod to snake-like in lizards
TLDR
Testing whether trade-offs exist between locomotion in surface, fossorial and cluttered habitats in Australian Lerista lizards found that snake-like species penetrated sand substrates faster than more lizard- like species, representing the first direct support of the adaptation to fossoriality hypothesis. Expand
Extended molecular phylogenetics and revised systematics of Malagasy scincine lizards.
TLDR
A new phylogenetic hypothesis for Malagasy skinks of the subfamily Scincinae based on an extended molecular dataset comprising 8060bp from three mitochondrial and nine nuclear loci is provided and three different genera are proposed to remove the non-monophyly of Amphiglossus sensu lato to facilitate future studies on this fascinating group of lizards. Expand
EVIDENCE FOR REPEATED ACQUISITION AND LOSS OF COMPLEX BODY‐FORM CHARACTERS IN AN INSULAR CLADE OF SOUTHEAST ASIAN SEMI‐FOSSORIAL SKINKS
TLDR
One of the most comprehensive, fine‐scale analyses of squamate body‐form evolution to date is provided, introducing a new model system of closely related, morphologically variable, lizards and revealing that species of the genus Brachymeles exemplify regions of morphospace (body plans) previously undocumented in squamates. Expand
...
1
2
3
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 68 REFERENCES
HOW LIZARDS TURN INTO SNAKES: A PHYLOGENETIC ANALYSIS OF BODY‐FORM EVOLUTION IN ANGUID LIZARDS
TLDR
This paper combines a molecular phylogeny for 27 species, morphometric data, and phylogenetic comparative methods to provide the first statistical phylogenetic tests of several long‐standing hypotheses for the evolution of snakelike body form, and finds no support for the hypothesized sequence going from body elongation to limb reduction to digit loss. Expand
The origin of higher taxa: macroevolutionary processes, and the case of the mammals
TLDR
The reconstructed sequence of acquisition of mammalian traits supports the correlated progression model, and inferred speciation bias in favour of relatively small, relatively more progressive carnivores indicates that species selection was also involved in driving the trend. Expand
Correlated progression and the origin of turtles
TLDR
It is shown that certain pareiasaurs—dwarf, heavily armoured forms such a Nanoparia—approach the chelonian morphology even more closely than previously thought, suggesting that the rigid armoured body of turtles evolved gradually, through 'correlated progression'. Expand
WHY DOES A TRAIT EVOLVE MULTIPLE TIMES WITHIN A CLADE? REPEATED EVOLUTION OF SNAKELIKE BODY FORM IN SQUAMATE REPTILES
TLDR
The repeated origins of snakelike squamates appear to be associated with the in situ evolution of these two ecomorphs on different continental regions, with very little dispersal of most limb-reduced lineages between continental regions. Expand
Limb reduction in squamates : identification of the lineages and discussion of the trends
TLDR
An attempt is made to identify all squamate lineages having undergone limb reduction in the sense of having lost one or more bones from either the front or rear limb, and to characterize the hypothetical common ancestor of each of those lineages in terms of its limb bone morphology. Expand
Rates and Patterns in the Evolution of Snake-Like Body Form in Squamate Reptiles: Evidence for Repeated Re-Evolution of Lost Digits and Long-Term Persistence of Intermediate Body Forms
TLDR
Using morphometric data for 258 species and a time-calibrated phylogeny to explore rates and patterns of body-form evolution across squamates, it is found that the transition from lizard-like to snake-like body form involves concerted evolution of limb reduction, digit loss, and body elongation. Expand
Rapid and repeated limb loss in a clade of scincid lizards
TLDR
The exceptionally high frequency and rate of limb reduction inferred for Lerista emphasise the potential for rapid and substantial alteration of body form in squamates and reveals extraordinary evolutionary mutability of limb morphology in Lerista. Expand
Limb Reduction in the Scincid Lizard Genus Lerista. 2. Variation in the Bone Complements of the Front and Rear Limbs and the Number of Postsacral Vertebrae
TLDR
The condition of near or complete absence of the front limb in conjunction with the retention of two toes on the rear limb is common in Lerista and two other skink lineages inhabiting fine, loosely-consolidated sand, and the various configurations in the Lerista morphoclines are disproportionately represented by species; this may reflect speciation opportunities in various habitats. Expand
The concept of correlated progression as the basis of a model for the evolutionary origin of major new taxa
  • T. Kemp
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
  • 2007
TLDR
Application of the system-related concept of correlated progression to the pattern of evolution of traits and trait states as revealed by the fossil record of the stem groups of such taxa as mammals, turtles and tetrapods generates realistic testable hypotheses about how such groups evolved. Expand
LIKELIHOOD OF ANCESTOR STATES IN ADAPTIVE RADIATION
TLDR
It is concluded that measures of uncertainty are useful and should always be provided, despite simplistic assumptions about the probabilistic models that underlie them, and if uncertainty is too high, reconstruction should be abandoned. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...