Bmp4 and Morphological Variation of Beaks in Darwin's Finches

@article{Abzhanov2004Bmp4AM,
  title={Bmp4 and Morphological Variation of Beaks in Darwin's Finches},
  author={A. Abzhanov and Meredith E. Protas and B. R. Grant and P. Grant and C. Tabin},
  journal={Science},
  year={2004},
  volume={305},
  pages={1462 - 1465}
}
Darwin's finches are a classic example of species diversification by natural selection. Their impressive variation in beak morphology is associated with the exploitation of a variety of ecological niches, but its developmental basis is unknown. We performed a comparative analysis of expression patterns of various growth factors in species comprising the genus Geospiza. We found that expression of Bmp4 in the mesenchyme of the upper beaks strongly correlated with deep and broad beak morphology… Expand
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