Blood factors transfer beneficial effects of exercise on neurogenesis and cognition to the aged brain

@article{Horowitz2020BloodFT,
  title={Blood factors transfer beneficial effects of exercise on neurogenesis and cognition to the aged brain},
  author={Alana M. Horowitz and Xuelai Fan and Gregor Bieri and Lucas K Smith and Cesar I. Sanchez-Diaz and Adam B. Schroer and G{\'e}raldine Gontier and Kaitlin B Casaletto and Joel H. Kramer and Katherine E. Williams and Saul A. Villeda},
  journal={Science},
  year={2020},
  volume={369},
  pages={167 - 173}
}
Plasma transfers exercise benefit in mice Exercise has a broad range of beneficial healthful effects. Horowitz et al. tested whether the beneficial effects of exercise on neurogenesis in the brain and improved cognition in aged mice could be transferred in plasma (blood without its cellular components) from one mouse to another (see the Perspective by Ansere and Freeman). Indeed, aged mice that received plasma from young or old mice that had exercised showed beneficial effects in their brains… 
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