Blood-brain barrier permeation and efflux exclusion of anticholinergics used in the treatment of overactive bladder.

@article{Chancellor2012BloodbrainBP,
  title={Blood-brain barrier permeation and efflux exclusion of anticholinergics used in the treatment of overactive bladder.},
  author={Michael B Chancellor and David R. Staskin and Gary G. Kay and Bobby W. Sandage and Michael G. Oefelein and Jack W. Tsao},
  journal={Drugs & aging},
  year={2012},
  volume={29 4},
  pages={259-73}
}
Overactive bladder (OAB) is a common condition, particularly in the elderly. Anticholinergic agents are the mainstay of pharmacological treatment of OAB; however, many anticholinergics can cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and may cause central nervous system (CNS) effects, including cognitive deficits, which can be especially detrimental in older patients. Many anticholinergics have the potential to cause adverse CNS effects due to muscarinic (M(1)) receptor binding in the brain. Of note… CONTINUE READING