Blood and hemoglobin: The evolution of knowledge of functional adaptation in a biochemical system

@article{Edsall1972BloodAH,
  title={Blood and hemoglobin: The evolution of knowledge of functional adaptation in a biochemical system},
  author={John Tileston Edsall},
  journal={Journal of the History of Biology},
  year={1972},
  volume={5},
  pages={205-257}
}
  • J. Edsall
  • Published 1 September 1972
  • Chemistry, Medicine, Biology
  • Journal of the History of Biology
The circulat ing blood, while pass ing through the lungs, discharges carbon dioxide and takes on oxygen. As it flows through the capillaries of the tissues, it releases oxygen and takes up carbon dioxide. By the late n ine teenth century the basic na ture of this respiratory funct ion of the blood was clearly recognized. In the t ranspor t of oxygen the centra l role of hemoglobin, the i ron-containing protein of the red blood cells, was also apparent . However, the adapta t ion of s t ructure… Expand
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