Bleeding Tendency of Obstructive Jaundice

@article{Warner1938BleedingTO,
  title={Bleeding Tendency of Obstructive Jaundice},
  author={E. Warner and K. Brinkhous and H. Smith},
  journal={Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine},
  year={1938},
  volume={37},
  pages={628 - 630}
}
Summary 1. The bleeding tendency in cases of obstructive jaundice and biliary fistula is due to a prothrombin deficiency. 2. With restoration of bile to the intestine the prothrombin gradually returns to normal and the bleeding ceases. 3. Feeding of alfalfa extract, rich in Vitamin K, in addition to bile, causes a more rapid return of the prothrombin to normal. 
61 Citations
PLASMA PROTHROMBIN AND THE BLEEDING TENDENCY: WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO JAUNDICED PATIENTS AND VITAMIN K THERAPY
TLDR
The therapeutic use of vitamin K in the treatment of jaundiced bleeders was first reported by Warner, Brinkhous and Smith, and almost simultaneously by Butt, Snell and Osterberg, and indicated that dramatic relief from the bleeding tendency is obtained in most cases by the administration of Vitamin K. Expand
THE NATURE OF THE BLEEDING IN JAUNDICE
TLDR
Experimental observations made in studying the coagulation of blood are presented which furnish significant information on the nature of cholemic bleeding and to offer practical suggestions for the management of the jaundiced patient. Expand
Treatment of the hemorrhagic tendency in jaundice; with special reference to vitamin k
TLDR
Oral administration of a fat soluble vitamin and bile salts will increase the concentration of prothrombin and thereby reduce the clotting time of the blood and offers considerable hope for the ultimate control of the hemorrhagic diathesis in jaundiced persons. Expand
CLINICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF SOME FACTORS CAUSING PROTHROMBIN DEFICIENCIES: SIGNIFICANCE OF THE LIVER IN THEIR PRODUCTION AND CORRECTION
TLDR
The hemorrhagic tendency sometimes seen in patients with obstructive jaundice has been the subject of a great deal of clinical and experimental investigation, and this has now culminated in discovery of the underlying deficiency and of measures by which it can promptly be corrected in most cases. Expand
Clinical and experimental studies on vitamin K.
TLDR
The experimental and clinical work on which this theory is based are outlined, and a simple method that is recently devised for the recognition of the vitamin deficiency for patients having biliary fistulas or obstructive jaundice is described. Expand
THE RELATIONSHIP OF VITAMIN K TO HEMORRHAGE AND COAGULATION
  • S. Thayer
  • Medicine
  • Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
  • 1948
TLDR
Prior to 1880, hemorrhage in obstructive jaundice and allied conditions was merely an interesting observation that had little practical importance, but with the introduction of biliary surgery, bleeding took on a new significance and the percentage mortality from hemorrhage steadily increased, since death from other causes was greatly reduced. Expand
Purpura due to vitamin K deficiency in anorexia nervosa
A case is presented of purpura due to hypoprothrombinemia in a patient suffering from anorexia nervosa. The abnormal bleeding state was cured by the administration of Vitamin K.
THE PREOPERATIVE AND POSTOPERATIVE ADMINISTRATION OF VITAMIN K
TLDR
The reliability of vitamin K is determined by studying the factors concerned in the production of hemorrhagic diathesis characterizing patients who have jaundice and several lines of investigation having been pursued. Expand
A NEW AID IN CONTROL OF HEMORRHAGE IN SEVERE DAMAGE TO THE LIVER: TRANSFUSIONS OF BLOOD FORTIFIED BY ADMINISTRATION OF VITAMIN K TO DONORS
The study of vitamin K and its relation to coagulation of blood has been completed in many of its details, with most of the research following three lines of investigation. The first is based on theExpand
THE TREATMENT OF LIVER DISEASE
TLDR
Excerpts at treatment of parenchymatous disease of the liver other than those types which are entirely self-limited constitute a somewhat discouraging chapter in medical history. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...