Blast Trauma: The Fourth Weapon of Mass Destruction

@article{Born2005BlastTT,
  title={Blast Trauma: The Fourth Weapon of Mass Destruction},
  author={Christopher T. Born},
  journal={Scandinavian Journal of Surgery},
  year={2005},
  volume={94},
  pages={279 - 285}
}
  • C. Born
  • Published 1 December 2005
  • Medicine
  • Scandinavian Journal of Surgery
Injury from blast is becoming more common in the non-military population. This is primarily a result of an increase in politically motivated bombings within the civilian sector. Explosions unrelated to terrorism may also occur in the industrial setting. Civilian physicians and surgeons need to have an understanding of the pathomechanics and physiology of blast injury and to recognize the hallmarks of severity in order to increase survivorship. Because victims may be transported rapidly to the… 

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