Black Skin, The Queen's Masques: Africanist Ambivalence and Feminine Author(ity) in the Masques of Blackness and Beauty

@article{Andrea1999BlackST,
  title={Black Skin, The Queen's Masques: Africanist Ambivalence and Feminine Author(ity) in the Masques of Blackness and Beauty},
  author={Bernadette Diane Andrea},
  journal={English Literary Renaissance},
  year={1999},
  volume={29},
  pages={246 - 281}
}
  • B. Andrea
  • Published 1 March 1999
  • Art
  • English Literary Renaissance
What is fascinating . . . is to observe how their [literary critics’] lavish exploration of literature manages not to see meaning in the thunderous, theatrical presence of black surrogacy-an informing, stabilizing, and disturbing element-in the literature they do study. I t is interesting, not surprising, that the arbiters of critical power in American literature seem to take pleasure in, indeed relish, their ignorance of African-American texts. What is surprising is that their refusal to read… 
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References

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which Gordon refers to as "the first of many such representations" @. 154)
  • Gordon reproduces the stock representation of Diana in Renaissance iconography
O n the historical connection between blackness and the ominous in British culture, see Edwards
  • The Early African Presence in the British Isles
1990), indicates that "[tlhe hare, which figures prominently in so much myth and folklore, was long thought to be capable of routine sex change from year to year and thus inherently androgynous
  • Thomas Laqueur, Making Sex: Body and Gerider From the Greeks to Freud
Othello's allusion to Diana's blackened visage: "[Her] name, that was as fresh / As Dian's visage, is now begrim'd and black / As mine own face" (HI, 3.386-88). I quote from The Riverside Shakespeare
  • 1974
Edinburgh, 1944). p. 1 3 5 . For early modern Englishwomen's subjected status, see Joan Larsen Klein's collection Daughters, Wives, and Widows: Writings by Men about Women and Marriage in England
  • 1992
Eldred Jones explicates this common Renaissance trope in The Elizabethan Imdge ofAfrica (Folger Library, 1971)