Bite-force estimation for Tyrannosaurus rex from tooth-marked bones

@article{Erickson1996BiteforceEF,
  title={Bite-force estimation for Tyrannosaurus rex from tooth-marked bones},
  author={G. M. Erickson and Samuel D. Van Kirk and Jinntung Su and M. Levenston and W. Caler and D. Carter},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1996},
  volume={382},
  pages={706-708}
}
  • G. M. Erickson, Samuel D. Van Kirk, +3 authors D. Carter
  • Published 1996
  • Biology
  • Nature
  • WHETHER tyrannosaurs occupied predatory or scavenging niches has been debated for nearly a century1–5. Palaeontologists have turned to the study of dental morphology to address this question, but the results have been highly disparate. Some contend that the tyrannosaur dentition was very strong and well suited for engaging and killing herbivorous dinosaurs6,7. Others posit that tyrannosaurs ate carrion, because their teeth and/or jaws would fail during struggles with prey2,3. The discovery of… CONTINUE READING
    126 Citations
    THE CRUSHING BITE OF TYRANNOSAURIDS
    • 26
    Cranial mechanics and feeding in Tyrannosaurus rex
    • E. Rayfield
    • Biology, Medicine
    • Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences
    • 2004
    • 151
    The Biomechanics Behind Extreme Osteophagy in Tyrannosaurus rex
    • 28
    • PDF
    A tyrannosaur jaw bitten by a confamilial: scavenging or fatal agonism?
    • 22
    Feeding traces attributable to juvenile Tyrannosaurus rex offer insight into ontogenetic dietary trends
    • 1
    • PDF
    Craniocervical feeding dynamics of Tyrannosaurus rex
    • 30
    • PDF

    References

    SHOWING 1-10 OF 15 REFERENCES