Bistability of atmospheric oxygen and the Great Oxidation

@article{Goldblatt2006BistabilityOA,
  title={Bistability of atmospheric oxygen and the Great Oxidation},
  author={Colin Goldblatt and Timothy M. Lenton and Andrew J. Watson},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2006},
  volume={443},
  pages={683-686}
}
The history of the Earth has been characterized by a series of major transitions separated by long periods of relative stability. The largest chemical transition was the ‘Great Oxidation’, approximately 2.4 billion years ago, when atmospheric oxygen concentrations rose from less than 10-5 of the present atmospheric level (PAL) to more than 0.01 PAL, and possibly to more than 0.1 PAL. This transition took place long after oxygenic photosynthesis is thought to have evolved, but the causes of this… 
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