Bisphenol A: How the Most Relevant Exposure Sources Contribute to Total Consumer Exposure

@article{vonGoetz2010BisphenolAH,
  title={Bisphenol A: How the Most Relevant Exposure Sources Contribute to Total Consumer Exposure},
  author={Natalie von Goetz and Matthias Wormuth and Martin Scheringer and Konrad Hungerb{\"u}hler},
  journal={Risk Analysis},
  year={2010},
  volume={30}
}
Bisphenol A (BPA) is an endocrine disrupting chemical that is found in human urine throughout industrial societies around the globe. Consumer exposure pathways to BPA include packaged food, household dust, air, and dental fillings. To date, information on the relative contribution of the different pathways to total consumer exposure is lacking, but is key for managing substance‐associated risks. 

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