Birds Learn Socially to Recognize Heterospecific Alarm Calls by Acoustic Association

@article{Potvin2018BirdsLS,
  title={Birds Learn Socially to Recognize Heterospecific Alarm Calls by Acoustic Association},
  author={Dominique A. Potvin and Chaminda P Ratnayake and Andrew N. Radford and Robert D. Magrath},
  journal={Current Biology},
  year={2018},
  volume={28},
  pages={2632-2637.e4}
}

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