Bird wings trapped in amber are a fossil first from the age of dinosaurs

@article{Becker2016BirdWT,
  title={Bird wings trapped in amber are a fossil first from the age of dinosaurs},
  author={Rachel Becker},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2016}
}
Preserved feathers and tissue provide a picture of hatchlings from the Cretaceous. 
The Adaptation of Bloodsucking Black Flies to Feeding on Warm-blooded Animals
TLDR
Simuliidae morphological adaptations to suck the blood are combined into several groups: habitus, sensory vesicle of maxillary palp, mouthparts, claws adaptations, and the structure of females claws is adapted to various groups of hosts of the blood feeders – birds, mammals. Expand

References

SHOWING 1-3 OF 3 REFERENCES
Mummified precocial bird wings in mid-Cretaceous Burmese amber
TLDR
These specimens demonstrate that the plumage types associated with modern birds were present within single individuals of Enantiornithes by the Cenomanian, providing insights into plumage arrangement and microstructure alongside immature skeletal remains. Expand
Chung-tat Cheung An artist's illustration of an enantiornithine bird with its wing trapped in tree resin
  • Nature Commun
  • 2016
Cheung An artist's illustration of an enantiornithine bird with its wing trapped in tree resin